Monday, October 23, 2006

I could say it's for Billie, but he's knows so many knots by now, whereas I now finally understand a bowline after having it shown to me 34,328 times: Animated Knots

10 comments:

cleek said...

Thanks, Mike. I don't know nearly as many knots as I'd like, but I'm getting there. You might be interested in the contrictor knot (it'd be useful for woodworking).

Mike said...

My one complaint about that site is that there's no category for "around the house" knots. I know good knots for most of the things I need a knot for, except tying down loads and bundling up sticks with twine.

That last one is something I could do almost every weekend, if I were really dedicated to picking up all the sticks that drop in my yard. Man, we have a lot of trees.

cleek said...

I have a couple of knots I can show you for tying down loads, but a round turn and two half hitches will be fine in most situations. For bundling sticks, a timber hitch will work in most situations, and if you need to drag it, then turn your timber hitch into a killick hitch

Mike said...

I've been using two half hitches, which works pretty well, but I'm intrigued by the killick hitch. I think a modified version could work very well, but as it is, I think it might work itself loose as the bundle settles.

cleek said...

Whenever I have to firewood when we're backpacking I almost always use either a timber hitch or a killick hitch, and I've never had it come loose. Of course, that's just for gather wood and then putting it all in a big pile. Are you wanting the bundle to be more permanent for some reason?

cleek said...

holy crap I can't type today.

Mike said...

I'm usually bundling up twigs, sometimes with leave still attached, and I'm bundling them up on Saturday or Sunday in one part of the yard, then piling them up to wait for trash day, then they sit till Monday evening, when I carry them to the curb, then they sit all day till the trash guys pick them up.

Because of their composition, they're kind of squishy and tend to settle a lot. A timber hitch or killick hitch are mostly held together by tension, and if the tension decreases, the knot can come loose. That's why I think I'll try a modified killick with two half hitches instead of the timber hitch.

cleek said...

sounds like you're talking about doing marline hitching or half hitching. Both hitches are good ways to carry unwieldy bundles like a rolled up rug.

Mike said...

The marline hitch looks pretty useful. I'll have to try to learn it.

cleek said...

learn half hitching first, because the two hitches are very similar, but half hitching has the advantage of being a bit easier to remove, because the knots will just completely fall apart if the object is removed. Marline hitching, on the otherhand collapses into a series of overhand knots.